MYP Assessment Task Bank

In this assessment, students investigate areas of regular polygons (equilateral triangle, square, regular pentagon, regular hexagon, and so forth) that have the same side length. Through algebraic work, they will discover an area formula for each of these polygons, as well as a formula for the area of a regular polygon with n sides, each with a side length of 1 unit.

Math Concepts: area regular polygon SOHCAHTOA equilateral triangle square pentagon hexagon
MYP Related Concepts: models
MYP Key Concepts: logic
MYP Global Context: Identities and Relationships
In this assessment, students investigate two sets of patterns that arise from a sequence of square grids, in which some of the squares are shaded while the others are non-shaded. After observing the pattern in the given sequence, students focus on the pattern of shaded squares and suggest a general rule for them in the form of both a recursive and an explicit formula, then turn their focus on the pattern of non-shaded squares and discover a general rule for them in the form of an explicit formula. To close their investigation, students select and apply their choice of mathematical problem-solving techniques to verify and justify their previous findings.

Math Concepts: sequences quadratic sequence
MYP Related Concepts: equivalence patterns
MYP Key Concepts: logic
MYP Global Context: Identities and Relationships
In this assessment, students use their knowledge of the Pythagorean Theorem as well as right-angled and non-right-angled trigonometry to find the location that provides the optimal angle for the photo, which Tom the Tourist should take of the replica of the Statue of Liberty.

Math Concepts: trigonometry SOHCAHTOA sine rule cosine rule optimization maximum point
MYP Related Concepts: justification models
MYP Key Concepts: logic
MYP Global Context: Orientation in Space and Time
In this assessment, students investigate non-zero integer triples (called Addition Triples), in which (1) all three numbers are different non-zero integers, and (2) the first two numbers add up to the third number. For example, the number triple (2, 3, 5) form an Addition Triple as none of the three numbers are equal (i.e. they are all different), none of the three numbers are zeroes, and 2 + 3 = 5. Some other Addition Triples are (5, 6, 11) or (2, 5, 7). In this investigation, we are looking at the Total Number of Addition Triples that we can make from a list of n integers, considering whether n is an odd or even number.

Math Concepts: addition sets patterns
MYP Related Concepts: patterns systems
MYP Key Concepts: relationships
MYP Global Context: Identities and Relationships
In this assessment, students investigate the sum and the product of the roots of quadratic equations. While Parts A and B of the investigation provide guidance to finding the general formula for the sum of the roots, in Part C students are asked to conduct an independent investigation into the product of the roots of quadratic equations.

Math Concepts: quadratic equations quadratic formula roots sum of roots product of roots
MYP Related Concepts: patterns systems
MYP Key Concepts: relationships
MYP Global Context: Identities and Relationships